Tagged: London Bike Kitchen

Look Mum No Hands Podium Pants

Women and the cycling media

Last night I joined the panel at a London Bike Kitchen WaG event to discuss the ways in which women are portrayed in the cycling media. This isn’t actually us, but it is a great way to get your attention.

Look Mum No Hands Podium Pants

The wonderful ad for LMNH Podium pants

 

It was a privilege to sit alongside eloquent and informed speakers Jools Walker (cycling blogger and presenter), Laura Laker (cycling journalist) and Chris Garrison (cycling marketing expert) on the stage (which was actually a very wide window sill!) in front of a packed room of cyclists at Look Mum No Hands! What followed was a truly inspiring debate. Here’s a quick summary of some of the key points I put forward (not because I’m more fascinating than everyone else – clearly I’m not – but because I’d be here all night if I included everything that was said!), followed by a link to an excellent post about the whole event which highlights more of the topics we discussed.

On the panel at Look Mum No Hands

On the panel at Look Mum No Hands. Pic credit Yoko Aokee

First, I’m as passionate about the media as I am about cycling. I’ve been a magazine journalist for most of my career and it’s been fantastically rewarding work. Because my background is in women’s magazines – where women are the focus of everything that’s written – I’d like to see women represented more widely in the cycling media too.  I’m not used to being an afterthought!!

“It’s not women’s cycling, it’s cycling”.

I’d like to believe we can reach a point where we no longer feel the need to discuss ‘women’s cycling’ in the media as if it is something separate from general cycling. Unfortunately our cycling media, on the whole, currently feels like it is an exclusive men’s club. This may not be deliberate editioral or marketing policy, but it is still the case.

“For me, mountain biking is about freedom, joy and mini adventures…”

Imagery or copywriting that objectifies women has no place in cycling either. I’ve written about this before for Singletrack World, when I wrote an open letter to Maxxis in response to some of their more sexist advertising.  As a mountain biker and road cyclist, I’d prefer to see brands use their marketing material to reflect how it is out there on the trails/roads where, in my experience, cycling is largely a friendly, supportive and inclusive community of people having fun. It would be great to see that celebrated across the media instead.

“Focus on the good…”

If we see media coverage that we like then acknowledge it, share it, talk about it and reward the brands with our hard-earned cash! Which brings me on to the fabulous advert for Look Mum No Hands! podium pants (above). It is fun and it works – brands take note, the pants sold out off the back of this ad. And then there is this film, below, by Sealskinz about the power of mountain biking: a beautiful and moving acknowledgement of the fact that we all ride for different reasons.  Both ads are a refreshing, exciting glimpse of what our cycling media could become.

“Ordinary women doing extraordinary things”

Women cyclists are not all the same: we don’t share the same levels of participation, experience or areas of interest within cycling. We don’t all want to read the same blog posts (one woman will want to know about getting started, another about training for ultra cycling) nor buy the same kit.  What we do want is to  celebrate our diversity by sharing our stories. We don’t have to be world champion to have a great story to tell.

“Onwards and upwards…”

I’m glad to report that the audience in the room last night were as informed and empowered as the panel!!  There was a wonderful energy and a shared passion for cycling. I came home to read a huge number of supportive comments on social media. This is such an exciting time for women who cycle and it is a joy to be part of the discussions to move it forward in the media.

Thanks for inviting me, London Bike Kitchen!

You can see and read more about the event here.

 

 

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Matrix Fitness Pro Cycling team launch 2015

Join the debate: How is women’s cycling portrayed in the media?

I’m excited (and a bit nervous!) to report that I’ve been invited to join a panel of speakers to discuss how women’s cycling is portrayed in the media. The event is the first in a new series of WaG (women and gender variant) events and will be held at Look Mum No Hands in partnership with the London Bike Kitchen.

Matrix Fitness Pro Cycling team launch 2015

The riders from the Matrix Fitness Pro Cycling team, including Laura Trott (in white) meet the press.

 

The other speakers – experts on women who cycle, both of them – are Laura Laker, who has written for The Guardian, Cycling Weekly, Road.cc, Cycling Active, Bike Radar, Total Women’s Cycling, Bike Hub and Good Housekeeping, and cycling blogger Jools Walker who has also appeared regularly on ITV’s The Cycle Show and is also operations manager for Vulpine Cycling Apparel. And then there’s me – a former fashion and beauty editor for women’s magazines including Marie Claire and Just 17, and now a regular contributor to titles including Singletrack and Total Women’s Cycling as well as cycling brands including Velovixen and Evans Cycles (oh, and I still write ‘non-cycling’ fashion copy too!)

With my background in an area of journalism that has women at its core,  I’m really excited to discuss how – and why – the cycling media needs to get up to speed with women who ride. I’m expecting some forthright – and well informed – views from both the panel and the audience.

The event is open to all and free to attend, and it takes place on Wednesday 3rd February at Look Mum No Hands, 49 Old Street, EC1 9HX.

Hope to see you there!!