Tagged: What I wear on my mountain bike

What I wear on my mountain bike

“You must be the best dressed mountain biker in Britain,” joked my ride buddy as I got on my bike at Afan, wearing my third mountain bike outfit of the weekend.  While she may not be entirely accurate, as someone who gets to review a lot of kit here’s a round up of the stuff I really love at the moment.

 

fox3

First, a very brief history of women’s mtb gear….when I first started writing about women’s cycling there wasn’t much women’s mountain bike gear to mention, never mind co-ordinate into a matching outfit. There was plenty of road gear though, which was what I originally wore when I started riding fourteen years ago, but women specific mountain bike gear was mostly conspicuous in its absence. Mind you, there weren’t that many women riding then: perhaps it was because there was nothing to wear.*

*joke.

Mountain biking on the Barry Knows Best trail in Surrey women's cycling

Me in the olden days: not mountain bike gear – and riding the wrong line, I note.

Thankfully the 650b plus wheels of progress have rolled on and we now have some great gear to choose from, both from established brands and start-ups such as Flare and Findra (both started as women’s specific brands, incidentally).

I’m lucky to have had first hand experience of a lot of this kit because I have been asked to review it for various cycling sites, and inevitably that means keeping it (the time a journalist colleague was asked to return a pair of zip-crotch bib shorts – despite the fact she had worn them – has gone down in ‘review horror stories’ history).

So, here’s the disclaimer: almost all of this gear was sent to me for review, or as part of my Cotic brand ambassador project. I like to think, therefore, that it’s kind of a level playing field to choose a few highlights from. 🙂

Flare Clothing

UK based, fledgling brand with a great range of slim fit technical (short sleeve), Enduro (mid sleeve) and downhill (long sleeve) jerseys to choose from as well as super endurable Downhill shorts and lighter weight (but still very endurable) Enduro shorts. No prizes for guessing that this is a range made for and by mountain bikers: they’ve thought of every detail (4-way stretch, reinforced seat, water repellent, adjustable closure). There is a really great range of colourful designs, and sizes up to XL.

I’ve ridden miles in this kit since I received it in February and it has been supremely comfortable, hard wearing and easy to care for. The only downside for me is the velcro fasten on the shorts – because other garments stick to it in the washing machine (velcro- fasten gloves are also guilty of this).

Anyway, Flare have a sale on right now. A good time to pay a visit, then.

Findra

A Scottish mountain bike and outdoor brand for women that specialises in merino knitwear. Superb quality, surprisingly hard wearing and very comfortable (merino’s ability to regulate body temperature is legendary) – but so good that I almost feel its wasted on mountain biking. I’ve had a couple of Findra merino tops and worn both off the bike, and been complimented on them. I should also mention the merino accessories – neck warmers and arm warmers – which I wear A LOT for winter rides and which are so comfortable you don’t want to take them off afterwards.

My Findra mtb shorts https://findra.co.uk/shop/shorts/relaxed-bike-short-french-navy/are a thing of beauty – tailored fit (with a button fasten!), contrast zip, and two-way stretch for comfort. I wore them a lot for riding last year, and they are still looking good despite some long, hard rides and frequent washing.

Visit Findra here.

ION

ION started life making watersports gear (and still does), which would explain the surf influence to the designs (lots of bold, bright options although they have more muted colour combos too). There are three women specific lines to choose from – trail, all mountain and free ride (there is also a limited unisex downhill line). It is all made from highly efficient technical fabric and is therefore remarkably comfortable to ride in, even in hot conditions (which is why I wore it a lot while riding in Spain last year). It’s very lightweight and quick drying, but surprisingly robust and has a sanitised finish to help keep you fresh. They do great gloves too. I hadn’t really known about this brand until I was asked to review it, but I was blown away by how fantastic it is to ride in. Find out more here. 

FOX RACING ENDURO PADS

 

IMG_4189

I paid for these. The knee pads were purchased after I fell bare knee-first onto a pointy rock in Coed-y-Brenin, the elbow pads came a little later on. I doubt they would save me from breaking a limb (particularly as I’d decided it was too hot to wear them on the day I did actually fall off and break my elbow), but they certainly protect me from scrapes and scratches if I do come off the bike. Anyway, I always ride in them now. In winter they act a little like a knee/arm warmers, and despite what have said above, they are light enough to wear on all but the hottest summer days even when climbing. They are pliable, and never rub, so that you barely notice you are wearing them. A neoprene comfort blanket, if nothing else. Find them here

And underneath…

Urbanist Bettie cycling pants

Urbanist Betties. Sadly, this is not my bum.

I find Urbanist Bettie Cycling Pants super comfortable on all but the longest rides. However I know they are not for everyone – personal physiology as well as a well fitting saddle dictates that – all I can say is that they work for me. I love the lack of bulk: just a normal pair of pants with a little extra padding.Find them here.

Bike Nicks http://www.bikenicks.com do a very similar style, and I also have a pair of those that I wear a lot.

Bike Nicks review

No bum here either

I also love Vulpine’s merino padded boy shorts – super soft and comfortable, and a little more padding than the pairs above.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements